NOORI TALES
PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION
WATERAID & H&M FOUNDATION
STOCKHOLM, 2016

NAMING & BRAND IDENTITY
OUTDOOR EXHIBITION DESIGN
INDOOR EXHIBITION DESIGN
WEBSITE & PRINT COLLATERAL


 


Alongside collaborators Observatory and Rider, we designed and produced an outdoor and an indoor exhibition, identity and website showcasing the photographs by award-winning Malin Fezehai for WaterAid and the H&M Foundation.

Noori Tales: Stories from the Indus Delta features 31 images shot by Swedish-Eritrean photographer Malin Fezehai during her visit to the district of Thatta in the Sindh province of southeast Pakistan. The exhibition documents the reality of growing up amidst escalating problems caused by water scarcity and climate change. It forms part of the Kulturfestivalen (16-21 August) and World Water Week in Stockholm (28 August-2 September), the annual focal point for global water issues.

www.NooriTales.org / #NooriTales


Amongst the best things working with Studio Theolin was that they were really collaborative and were willing to take on tasks large and small to make the project happen. It was a full service, not ‘just design’, they worked across the production, location, design, concepts, PR, promotion and more, which we really needed to get it off the ground.
— Neil Wissink, Photography Manager, WaterAid UK


About the exhibition


Noori Jam Tamachi is a legendary figure in Thatta, Pakistan. The traditional tale describes her as a fisherwoman from Keenjhar Lake who married a local prince. Famed for her intelligence and admired for her kindness, Noori (“shining light” in Urdu) is buried in the middle of the lake, where there is now a shrine. Her enduring spirit can be seen as a beacon for the children who live in the region.

Award-winning photographer Malin Fezehai travelled with WaterAid to the Thatta region in southeastern Pakistan to document the effects of climate change and water scarcity on the lives of schoolchildren living in the Indus River Delta. Pakistan is highly vulnerable to climate change due to its geography, high dependence on agriculture and limited water resources. Flooding, salinisation of groundwater and high temperatures are all on the increase, with potentially devastating consequences.

With the 31 images in this exhibition, Malin takes us on a journey through the canals and inlets of the Indus River Delta, as they flow from one of Pakistan’s largest and most beautiful lakes, the Keenjhar – the source of drinking water for Karachi’s 16.6 million inhabitants – through to the schools and communities in the region.

WaterAid and the H&M Foundation have partnered for the three-year, SEK 60 million Global Program for Clean Water which aims to provide sanitation, water and hygiene promotion in schools, with a view to improving health and education and transforming children’s futures.

Read more about Malin FezehaiWaterAid and the H&M Foundation here


From the private view in the park. More photos below. 

From the private view in the park. More photos below. 


Photography by Malin Fezehai


Pupils await the start of lessons at the Government Girls Primary School in Chaudhry Atta Muhammad. Since the sanitation block was built, attendance has increased, with parents reassured that their children will not have to leave the school compound to find a place to go to the toilet.

Students in the coastal fishing community of Haji Karfoor Jat gather for lessons in the shade outside their schoolhouse, which is collapsing due to erosion caused by saline groundwater. Temperatures here can exceed 45 °C in peak summer.

Women collect water in traditional terracotta pots from the open canal in Noor Muhammad Thaheem. The canal transports drinking water from Keenjhar Lake to Karachi, however the local government will not allow the village residents to connect a pipe from the canal to their community, because they fear that the water supply to Karachi, which already suffers water shortages, will be reduced.

Women collect water in traditional terracotta pots from the open canal in Noor Muhammad Thaheem. The canal transports drinking water from Keenjhar Lake to Karachi, however the local government will not allow the village residents to connect a pipe from the canal to their community, because they fear that the water supply to Karachi, which already suffers water shortages, will be reduced.

11-year-old Shaneela stands by a window inside her one-room home in Muhammad Ali Bhar. Her parents do not allow her to attend school, although she often sneaks into the classroom anyway. Her parents say they will send her to school when there is access to water and a separate functioning toilet for girls.

11-year-old Shaneela stands by a window inside her one-room home in Muhammad Ali Bhar. Her parents do not allow her to attend school, although she often sneaks into the classroom anyway. Her parents say they will send her to school when there is access to water and a separate functioning toilet for girls.

Four-year-old Benazir attends class with boys and girls of different ages in Haji Saleh Jat.

An older girl fixes her younger classmate’s headscarf in Haji Saleh Jat. Residents of the area are famed for their skilled embroidery work. “The children are so clean and beautiful now,” says head teacher Abdul Hakeem. “That has been a positive change; there is a healthier environment around the school.”

An older girl fixes her younger classmate’s headscarf in Haji Saleh Jat. Residents of the area are famed for their skilled embroidery work. “The children are so clean and beautiful now,” says head teacher Abdul Hakeem. “That has been a positive change; there is a healthier environment around the school.”

Women collect water from the open canal in Noor Muhammad Thaheem.

Women collect water from the open canal in Noor Muhammad Thaheem.

Six-year-old Gul stands amid the ruins of her classroom in Haji Karfoor Jat. The school’s walls and ceiling are collapsing due to erosion by saline groundwater and salt winds blowing from the nearby Arabian Sea.

A boy climbs out of the canal after a swim in Noor Muhammad Thaheem. The canal is the only source of non-saline water accessible to villagers for their homes. This untreated water is used for bathing as well as cooking and drinking.

A boy climbs out of the canal after a swim in Noor Muhammad Thaheem. The canal is the only source of non-saline water accessible to villagers for their homes. This untreated water is used for bathing as well as cooking and drinking.


Camera in the Classroom


What does life in the communities of Thatta look like from the inside? WaterAid will be sharing a unique project which captures water scarcity from the point of view of eight schoolchildren.

Over the course of a three week workshop, four boys and four girls learned basic photography skills and interview techniques in order to document life in an area of Pakistan that is struggling to cope with the day-to-day impact of climate change and freshwater scarcity. 

To see the remarkable images these students took,
follow #NooriTales on Twitter.


Main exhibition – the build


One of the main features of the design are our leaning panels – inspired how the Indus Delta cuts through the landscape. 


Main exhibition – launch event and private view


Private View at Berns. Panel discussion with: 
Malin Fezehai, Photographer
Cecilia Chatterjee-Martinsen CEO, WaterAid Sweden
Diana Amini Global Manager, H&M Foundation


We love it! Powerful images & stories displayed in a fantastic Stockholm location.
— WaterAid International

The design duo Jenny Theolin & Dan Bull

The design duo Jenny Theolin & Dan Bull

Larissa & Neil from WaterAid, Jenny and Dan from Studio Theolin 

Image credit = WaterAid/ Felix Swensson

Image credit = WaterAid/ Felix Swensson

Image credit = WaterAid/ Felix Swensson

Image credit = WaterAid/ Felix Swensson

Image credit = WaterAid/ Felix Swensson

Image credit = WaterAid/ Felix Swensson

Image credit = WaterAid/ Felix Swensson

Image credit = WaterAid/ Felix Swensson

Image credit = WaterAid/ Felix Swensson

Image credit = WaterAid/ Felix Swensson

Image credit = WaterAid/ Felix Swensson

Image credit = WaterAid/ Felix Swensson


Indoor Exhibition & Internal Auction at H&M 


For me Jenny’s “no problems, we can do that”- attitude was something I really appreciated. Like a positive injection, always looking for solutions and a way forward. Even if she sometimes (might have) thought we were a pain, she never showed. And her ability to tie all parts of the production together was second to none.
— Johanna Sällström-Köhler, Communications Project Manager, WaterAid Sweden

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PR



Are you a photographer, artist or brand in need for a PR and/or event expert? Or are you an artist with an idea you need help realised, get in touch!

If you enjoyed this case study, have a look at Bollo at Berns too – another photography event we launched.

For more information, send me an email and I will tell you all about this event, or chat to you about yours!

/ Jenny Theolin